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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 330 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
May 15, 2012 6:00am EDT
, it david miliband, a former u.k. ambassador to the united states, and my former british colleague at nato. we have widespread support for this report. we are very grateful for their intellectual import and personal support, so that is what i wanted to say. at the order is for us to have a brief conversation, and then we will be happy to take whatever questions you have. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much for that. first of all, it is important to state that the atlantic council as a council does not take a point of view on anything, because it would just be too hard to get all of the members to agree, but i do think one thing we all agree on is a strong alliance and an enduring alliance, and this report points us in that direction. let me ask probably just two questions, and i will go to the audience right away, and two of the more controversial points, clearly, what you're saying on germany is tough, and it is saying it to a germany where many germans would argue, are we not doing the most important thing we could possibly do for the future of europe right now, which is aiding
CSPAN
May 21, 2012 12:30am EDT
and that the provision is unique to the united states. this is half an hour. >>> american history tv is in milwaukee at the organization of american historians annual meeting and we're joined by professor eric foner from columbia university and linda kerber with the university of iowa. thanks to both of you for joining us. you'll be talking about at this conference about birthright citizenship and the 14th amendment. why don't you set the stage for us, mr. foner, and what is birthright citizenship? >> well, in a nutshell, this is the principle that any person born in the united states, regardless of the status of their parents, their ancestors, regardless of their race, gender, religion, any other category, is a citizen of the united states just by the virtue of being boerch here. of course you can also become a citizen by naturalization if you're an immigrant. but the important point is this was not a principle that goes all the way back to the institution constitution. it was really implemented or institutionalized in the aftermath of the civil war and the 14th amendment which wrote it into the co
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 10:00am EDT
now becomes president of the united states. very interesting circumstances, obviously. we are just about to wrap up the war in europe. we are island hopping our way to japan. i mean, it looks promising, and yet there are all kinds of potholes along the way. we still have to finish the defeat of germany. we still have to finish off japan. how we do that, when we do that, and then one of the consequences of what we're doing, that's the rest of this story. truman is going to meet with stalin and churchill in potsdam, germany, after hitler is defeated. it's a new big three now with harry truman being the president now instead of roosevelt. truman's attitude is going to be very different from that of roosevelt, and some indication of that change of u.s. policy comes right away. remember i mentioned to you that even vice president harry truman had not been kept informed of the manhattan project. when he becomes president it's like, okay, there are a few things that you probably need to know. one of them is we've been working on a bomb and, you know what, it's the biggest, baddest bomb ar
CSPAN
May 8, 2012 6:30pm EDT
will be flying to berlin. and a few days later, he will become to the united states to attend the g-8 summit hosted by president barack obama at camp david. and that will also be very important international test that president hollande will be facing very soon in his presidency. >> we're talking about europe's challenge to austerity. independents 202-628-0205. if you're calling from outside the united states today, we hope that you will, 202-628-0184. as always, we'll be taking your tweets, looking at your e-mails and the conversation continues on facebook. our first call comes from spokane, washington. mary on our line for republicans. you're on "the washington journal." go ahead. >> ye >>. >> caller: yeah, here in the united states, we have the same issues you're having over there, but your countries always seem more on the ball to listen to the people. and i was wondering why -- i always suggested how come you guys go to the people and ask their opinion or like i suggested here in the state, there's a lot of people in the united states that are intelligent. they just can't physically wor
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 10:30am EDT
to place it in a larger perspective, and that is by non-indians who want equality in the united states, wrapping themselves in the flag, and native peoples were here first, and survival, the fact that they have survived as separate cultures uniquely on the planet as american indians is, to me, the most noteworthy. they have not melded into the mainstream. by and large, tribes are still operating. some are in better shape than others, some are larger, some are smaller. some have suffered more, some have suffered slightly less, but they are still here, and if i wanted to change one thing, i would like the mainstream of america to realize that american indians, as tribes and tribal people, are still here, still a vibrant part of the economy, a part of the culture, a part of the arts, literature, music, this is, after all, oklahoma is, after all, an american indian state at its start, and american indians have not disappeared or vanished into the mainstream with dinosaurs, as some people are prone to ask me sometimes. >>> find out where skrchlt span's local content vehicles are going next
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 5:00pm EDT
. missouri's own harry truman now becomes president of the united states. very interesting circumstances. obviously. we are just about to wrap up the war in europe. we are island hopping our way to japan. i mean, it looks promising and yet there are all kinds of potholes along the way. we still have to finish the defeat of germany. we still have to finish off japan. how we do that, when we do that, and then what are the consequences of what we're doing, that's the rest of this story. true man truman is going to mee with stalin and churchill in germany after hitler's defeatedh stalin and churchill in germany after hitler's defeated.truman stalin and churchill in germany after hitler's defeated.truman stalin and churchill in germany after hitler's defeated.truman stalin and churchill in germany after hitler's defeated.ruman i stalin and churchill in germany after hitler's defeated.pgermany after hitler's defeated.pogerma defeated.tsgermany after hitler defeated.dgermany after hitler' defeated.agermany after hitler' defeated.mgermany after hitler' defeated.potsdam germany after hitler's def
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 4:30am EDT
between russia and the united states there, have been many successes, including the s.t.a.r.t. treaty, cooperation on afghanistan, iran, and north korea. civilian nuclear power, and other areas. but there have been notable differences over syria, missile defense, human rights, enforcement of intellectual property rights and con dufkt elections last month. both president put spin and president obama have called for a deepening of economic cooperation between the two countries. the russian state duma its expected to ratify russia's succession to the wto in june or july. we expect 30 days after that, roughly, that russia will become a member of the world trade organization. for the united states, to take advantage of the new market openings in the russian market, congress must pass legislation to grant russia permanent normal trade relations treatment. the panel today will focus on prospects for improving relations with russia, and how the wto process has prompted russia to take measures to open its economy, to more international trade and investment. we had timed this panel so it could
CSPAN
May 16, 2012 7:30am EDT
front of the u.s. capitol, this is half an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of united states. >> detail, colors. present arms. [silence] >> detail, color guard, right shoulder, order. arm. >> please stand for the assessment of the colors like united states capitol police, and remain standing for our national anthem. [silence] >> detail, color guar guard. present arms. >> we will now have the national anthem by kathy williams. ♪ oh, say, can you see ♪ by the dawn's early light ♪ what so proudly we hailed ♪ at the twilight's last gleaming? ♪ ♪ whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ thro' the perilous fight ♪ o'er the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming t ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave ♪ ♪ o'er the land of the free ♪ and the home of the brave? >> detail, color guard. order, right shoulder, arms. >> please remain standing for the invocation. >> please join me in prayer. our gracious fathe
CSPAN
May 5, 2012 10:00am EDT
might appear to suggest trading large areas of europe for war with the united states may be hard going. at the ambassadorial group in washington, secretary general sticker confirmed this was not a needle-steering group and the council had not given it any power. a number of nations expressed strong dissatisfaction about the lack of information they were receiving about berlin planning, about the ambassadorial group giving instructions and about the way that the allied powers were presenting papers to nato committees on a take it or leave it basis. the canadian ambassador said if the allies are to be committed in war, they should be informed in peace. the belgian ambassador added, since they're all in danger of war, they should all take part in the planning. the four powers responded quickly to this strong sense of dissatisfaction in the nato council. on september 27th, they provided a full report on live oak plans and secretary general also presented the ambassadors with these new suggested instructions to nato military authorities, which he helped to draft. the instructions stated, if
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 8:30am EDT
of real significance to the united states. to do that, we will dedicate 80% of our effort to four major cases. right now they are syria, kenya, north/central america and burma. then we'll have another eight to ten places where we can test new approaches or make a welcome difference by just sending the the right person at the right time. so far i think we're gaining traction in each of our major priority engagements. many of you are working in these places, and we realize that we won't know it all or know best about them, so we hope for your support. in syria we are providing a nontraditional surge to empower and unite a fractured, nonviolent opposition. as the secretary announced, that includes providing nonlethal assistance. we are also working with partners to set up an outpost for the internal opposition to coordinate and communicate with the international community. in kenya we are helping to develop plans to insure peaceful and credible elections a year before the vote. incidentally, kenya is one place where we've seen a potential model for broad cooperation and innovation. in nort
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 8:00pm EDT
. as the president said, preventing a nuclear iran is in the interest of the united states. we have issued reports, and the most recent one was issued on and.ary 1 and it includes a distinguished panel of four democratic members of congress, admirals' and generals and also experts to area our last report supported the view that the best approached to this challenge is a simultaneous pursuit of a triple track policy, which is of diplomacy, tough sanctions, and a credible and invisible military threat. we also issued a white paper on each of those tracks. i want to highlight one recommendation on each of those tracks, and then i will change it over to mort zuckerman. and the military threat we believe the united states should boost the credibility of its military to air around us nuclear facilities, and we have spelled out how to do so. one element has been selling bunker busters' to israel. we do not advocate an israeli strike, but this will send a strong signal to tehran to negotiate in good faith, encourage other states that the alternative to supporting u.s. sanctions could be military conflict
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 10:00pm EDT
a bigger problem within diplomacy. but the united states has been willing to use both force and diplomacy to really try to solve the problem. i think in the case of north korea, that that -- it's just not registered like that. that is not specific to any administration. we have had crises with north korea and every administration has made the same calculation. when we reach a crisis with north korea, are we willing to go all-out to the end to solve this thing, or do we want a solution that will park it momentarily, put him diplomatic tracks, present and kevin and want move on to the other issues that most concern us, whether it is the domestic and economic situation or iraq or afghanistan or syria or the middle east peace process. these tend to be the more it important issues in u.s. foreign policy. >> the other issue that makes iraq different is the u.s. korea alliance. have you see the dynamics of the alliance playing into our ability to adjust the top concerns that the u.s. has related to north korea's nuclear program? >> undeniably, and when we look at the situation, south korea is mo
Current
May 3, 2012 5:00pm PDT
is the united states didn't have much competition in those days we won the war and japan and europe were not major competitors. but even today germany, other countries like germany, they have a social compact very similar to the one we had. and that means german workers are enjoying the benefits of productivity increases, unemployment is relatively low, and their standard of living is very high, and the very rich take home a much smaller share of the total gains from growth than they do in the united states. >> professor i want to focus on that last issue, because you are exactly correct. you know i agree with you, any importance of unions and the social account that we all believe will help the entirety of our population central to what we should be doing. let's talk about trade in particular, because we have entered a series of multi-lateral and by bilateral trade agreements how can workers compete against labor in the number you hear is 2 to 3 billion additional workers competes against our domestic work force. so that general motors and ford are now invest
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 5:30pm EDT
important basic research projects in american history underway in the united states. tim was the founding director of that project. after his service on that project and continuing to publish other acclaimed books, he now actually holds his job as the collector of the richard nixon library out in california. as the director of the nixon library, tim has not only been organizing world history projects of his own, he's actually set precedents in almost setting the model of how to run a presidential library under the most difficult possible circumstances. it's a tribute to his abilities. then to tim's right, your left is bob strong. i know bob strong principally through his scholarship. bob works in that strange netherworld where you study american politics by understanding its political history. some days he looks like a political historian and could be an exemplar of both. i think he's probably the single most prominent and important historian of the carter presidency to publish so far. his work on carter's foreign policy is today the standard work that any scholar looking at that must rea
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 11:00pm EDT
is that the united states as a individual nation and nato collectively as an alliance have to do long-term thinking about where it. wants to be in ten or eight years time. and outline the type of missions it envisions undertaking in the future and what capabilities will be required to undertake the missions. and kind of set some -- identify some kind of priority areas for the alliance knowing that most allies simply aren't going to be able to do everything every time. not every ally will be able to do everything from peace keeping to high intensity combat. we have a number of al thrice have reached that point and are starting to specialize and develop these capabilities if it's not coordinated you could end up with everybody. it's like a pot luck dinner. you don't have any main course when everybody brings desert. the summit going to try to start the alliance on the healthier course. but it's also going to start first and foremost with delivering on some commitments made in lisbon. you might remember, the alliance watched the lisbon critical caimentn'ts commitment. where the alliance identified ten
CSPAN
May 12, 2012 10:30am EDT
, but mainly documents and memories. documents and memories. the united states government and other entities devote quite a lot of effort to getting and preserving documents, and sometimes things. you can go to the smithsonian museum and see a bunch of things. and some documents. so we devote some effort to securing and preserving the documents and things. the memories which i think you probably admit from your own life are more interesting than your documents, are not really preserved with any active effort whatsoever. the united states government spends almost no money to preserve the memories, record any of the memories, least of all from the people who helped run the government of the most powerful country in the world. it simply is not an important effort for the united states government. we don't spend much money on basic research in american history of any kind. in this particular form we spend none as a government, as a country. i mentioned this as background for the fact that the miller center thought this was important. there was an initial effort under my predecessor, the director
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 7:00pm EDT
book, "crusade 2.0", which is about islamic phobia and its effects in the united states, studied by city life, great press. and instead of reading from the book, i thought it was just a presentation for you and for part. the four parts are going to be a visit, a palm, and e-mail and then finally a political ad. let's start with this. a couple weeks ago i went to new york city have visited park 51, an interesting islamic cultural center. and there he saw the different programs they have available. they teach error back, calligraphy. they have a course on capillary, a brazilian martial art. it was a fascinating, it occurs to me, you might not know what i'm talking about because you might not recognize part 51, the action name part 51 because you might be more familiar with the name that was used in the media to describe park 51, which is of course the ground zero mosque. it was two years ago that this islamic cultural center, not a mosque in knoxville is located at ground zero, but several blocks away became the focus of the great controversy. i don't know if you remember that two
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 12:00pm EDT
states. hispanic children are at the highest level of poverty in the history of the united states. i think the challenge is not how to bring them over to immigration reform or dialogue. just to make sure the latino community knows these facts and understands the failure of president obama. >> i agree with you there is a lot of ammunition. these comments about self deportation have indicated to some in the community he does not have respect for them. go to south texas and talk to latino ranch and farm owners and small businesses and members of the hispanic community. they are hard asses because they are the first to feel the adverse affect. cartels are shooting at them. are competing for jobs. there are a lot of reasons why they are hard asses but they do want to know the presidential candidate has respect for the community and in recognition this is not all a mexican problem. half the people here illegally came from hong kong the, nigeria on a visa and overstating it. the fact that all the people from central america are unworthy is a real problem. >> thank you. >> we will get behind
CSPAN
May 15, 2012 1:00am EDT
to north korea's missile program, missiles that are targeted to the united states. in light of that, what is your view of the administration's position to lift export controls to china? on lethal weapons? >> you know, one of the -- it is conventional wisdom, but it is very wrong. the conventional wisdom is a china that looks hundreds of years in the future, they have thousands of years of history. china knows, they are thinking three moves ahead of us on the chessboard. if that's true, why do they continue to prop up a north korean regime? why would you want to prop up a regime that has 150,000 or 200,000 people starving to death? why would you want one that continues? it's only cash is nuclear weapons, and continuing to not only move forward but exporting those kinds of technologies into the most volatile parts of the world. the chinese leader was here in town, and there were four or five of us. i said why? why do you continue to prop up the regime? it is a blot on the reputation of your government. and his answer was -- and i'm not making this up. chinese translator, senator mccain is w
CNN
May 6, 2012 12:00pm PDT
means for the united states, christine romans, host of "your bottom line" and christie freeland, editor for thomsons reuters digital. today they fired french president nicolas sarkozy. he will be replaced by socialist francois hollande. sarkozy becomes the highest profile european leader ousted during the region's economic crisis. cnn's senior european correspondent jim bittermann joins us live from paris. jim? >> reporter: you know how they say you should have been here a day ago. you should have been here an hour and 15 minutes ago. this place was packed with sar k cozy supporters thinking he had a chance to win and he didn't win. he conceded defeat almost immediately when the numbers came from the television networks across the country, the exit polls. here is a little bit of the concession speech he gave to the followers here. >> translator: trance hfrance h republic, a new president, this is a choice. francois hollande is the president of france and must be respected. >> reporter: and while the crowd here is thinning out, one of the things that sarkozy said was that he was going to
CSPAN
May 31, 2012 3:30am EDT
, the 41st president of the united states, george herbert walker bush. [ applause ] >> let me start by saluting our friends at the john f. kennedy presidential library and museum for launching their jfk 50 justice for all program. i'm particularly happy to single out carolyn kennedy and todd putnam as well as bringham mccutchen and jay zimmer for making this program a reality. your topic strikes a real chord with me, as a young congressman from texas, i well remember the open housing vote back in 1968. i voted with those who were fighting to give americans of all races and creeds the chance to buy a good home and a good neighborhood. later, as president, we got the americans with disabilities act passed, to make sure that tens of millions with disabilities had fuller access to the american dream. of course, these two instances are only part of a broader struggle for civil rights here at this forum and at other programs, you can learn how and why so many americans across this great land came together for a noble cause, basic human dignity, equal opportunity under the law, recognizing
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 6:30pm EDT
in afghanistan, the united states really pulled back. we won the cold war, we won the covert action issue with respect to afghanistan, and as you all have very well pointed out, there were other fish to fry, germany, gorbachev taking a lot of time and effort on the part of the administration. i guess my question is was there any consideration given during that time, to your knowledge, of trying to stay in there in that region, trying to keep an eye on what osama might become, trying to deal with the disease that began with the iranian revolution of going back to a more fundamentalist, islamic approach. i tend to credit the stories that say the administration was busy on another front, but it's worth looking at, because the taliban that had its roots there is still with us. >> i didn't wrk after -- work afghan issues in 1989. maybe you will remember this. hi to look back a bit. as a historian, the interesting thing, you have to remember before the soviet invasion of afghanistan, it is not like afghanistan had been an important place to the united states. in other words, the united states c
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 12:45am EDT
that refused to fight in the united states for example eugene debs rose to give a tour against american participation in the war and was sent to prison and was still in prison in november 1920 when he received nearly a million votes for president on the socialist ticket. another america the pioneer social worker jane addams also was a strong opponent of the war for more than 500 americans were jailed as conscientious objectors including these two at fort riley arkansas. in germany the great radical spoke out against the war and britain the meeting philosopher was most elegant of the war a hero for me writing this book. i will review one thing if you want describing the feeling he rode and i appreciate him because of this intellectual bravery and acknowledging the conflict in his feelings which is something that often most of us don't do when we take a political stand. they describe themselves as being tortured by patriotism as ardently as any retired colonel. love of them was the strongest the motion i possessed and in a period setting aside such a moment making it difficult as truth, t
CSPAN
May 31, 2012 12:00am EDT
. he's the first president in the history of the united states to call it murder, and w.e.b. dubois editorializes on the front page of "the crisis." fdr does not support the legislation in '35, '36, '37 or '38 when it comes up, by 1938, eleanor roosevelt spends seven days sitting in the gallery of the united states senate, and she's surrounded by civil rights leaders, all people of color. when they ask her what eleanor is doing, she says, "i am bearing witness," and that to me is a powerful, powerful statement. so you have to look at, granted there was no legislation passed, but there were internal policies changed. there was eleanor's outspokenness. there was her literally putting her life on the line for this, and there were executive orders written, and the justice department created. so i look at his record as a huge step forward to help jump-start where we want to be. was that good in three minutes? [ laughter ] >> i've never done it this fast. ever. [ applause ] >> so let's move to another small topic. [ laughter ] >> the desegregation of the armed forces, we'll have a pan
CSPAN
May 16, 2012 9:00am EDT
's a friend and ally of the united states. we are not calling for australian membership. we are calling for a partnership to develop. australia trains more energetically with germany and britain and france. you already trained significantly with the united states. let's say there is another humanitarian disaster the way there was in december of 2004 what happened on december 26th, australia, united states and japan and india deployed together to help the people of sri lanka and southern india because we had trained together in the air and sea. we want that type of cooperation. you have been a stalwart ally in afghanistan but you had to do it on the run not having worked very much with the european allies. it is inculcating patterns of cooperation and military training and confers no obligation on the part of parter countries. in essence it is the best of both worlds for the asia-pacific allies from my perspective. >> also hearing the most frequent complaint from australian officials is you are more than happy to use soldiers and resources in battle but we are not involved in the plannin
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 10:00am EDT
. and the united states. so as i said at the beginning, 2010 was the summer of hate, two years ago. and you probably remember terry jones who promised to burn a copy of the quran. you might remember the beginning of an anti-sharia movement that pushes to pass legislation at a state level to ban sharia law, islamic law. it starts in oklahoma where there's this huge muslim population. no, there's knotts a huge miss -- there's not a huge muslim population in oklahoma. it's ridiculous, and the whole movement is ridiculous since there have been no cases of sharia law actually being cited with one exception in new jersey which was then overturned. and, of course, you remember that summer as well as two years before all of the rumors that obama, our president, is muslim. one-third of all republicans believed this according to polling at the time. one-quarter of the entire electorate believes this. and, of course, the ground zero mosque. the ground zero mosque becomes a political litmus test to determine how politicians stand on this key issue. mayor bloomberg, for it. newt gingrich, he's against i
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 3:00pm EDT
between the united states and afghanistan. not an agreement between individuals. it's a national agreement. entered into because it was in interests of the united states and afghanistan. the first thing. the second thing is that it is obligations on both sides. which we would seek to being implemented. obligations on the u.s. side and on the afghan side. >> okay. stephen and then we'll let tom go. >> how concerned is the u.s. that the continuing budget cuts and austerity in europe could have nato to xct act in the fut in a situation like libya? and growth in europe. do you expect any actions that could impact the economy, the european economy in a short term and obviously an effect on the u.s. economy? >> actions in what context? >> actions on growth rather than simply talking about how growth is an important factor. >> okay. with respect to nato and the way forward, one of the sessions indeed the first alliance session will be devoted to nato capabilities. and they have, the nato allies have undertaken a study over the last two years focused on those capabilities that if believes are esse
CSPAN
May 9, 2012 1:00pm EDT
for the economy of the united states. i have been a supporter of the export-import bank since i arrived in congress in 1977. simply put, the ex-im bank supports the sales of american-made products overseas when private finances is not available. -- financing is not available. according to the ex-im bank's 2011 annual report, the bank supported $32.7 billion in exports last year, over 288,000 american jobs. many of these jobs are in the pacific northwest and in my congressional district. i ask unanimous consent to put -- and add additional information. the important point srk let's vote for this bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from california. mr. miller: i'm pleased to yield one minute to the distinguish mad jort leader, the gentleman from virginia, mr. cantor. the chair: the gentleman from virginia is recognized for one minute. mr. cantor: i thank the speaker and i thank the gentleman from california. mr. speaker, i rise today to speak in favor of h.r. 2072, securing american jobs through export act of 2011. make no mistake, i am no fan of government sub
CSPAN
May 15, 2012 10:00am EDT
the challenges with less risk of damage to the economies of the rest of the world and the united states. >> if breeze is forced out of the euro before they get to this wonderful package of slower austerity and more growth? is forced out of the euro? >> europe as a whole has a very strong incentive in doing what it's gone to take to make monetary union work. that's what the reforms over the last six months have tried to do. they tried to put in place a set of mechanisms for discipline in fiscal policy and cooperating on fiscal policy, for sharing as of resources, for managing the financial system that need to make monetary union work. i think their decisions, confronted with this fear of broad erosion in your experiment, is to redouble their commitment to try to make this thing work. if we believe they have the ability to do that. we hope they manage this process. very difficult set of intelligence. >> to learn anything from their experience or is it totally different? >> the talent is are different, but if you listen to where we started this conversation, what we're trying to do is make
CNN
May 13, 2012 10:00am PDT
. >>> this is "gps, the global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we'll begin today's show in europe. voters in france and greece made their anti-austerity feelings known last weekend and stock markets plunged. we'll have a panel on the big picture and what it means for politics in the west. >>> then robert zoelik will step down as head of the world bank. his exit interview here on "gps." >>> next, we go to israel which has anointed a king. what in the world does it mean? >>> and, finally, the curious case of the guy who has come to be known as american french fry brother. a cultural lost in translation all the way from china. you won't want to miss it. >>> first, here's my take. everyone is looking at europe these days as economic and political protests mount across the continent. the downward spiral in europe has produced a great debate over the virtues of austerity. the idea that government with large budget deficits must reduce these deficits mainly by cutting spending. if they don't get their budgets in order, they won't be ab
CSPAN
May 15, 2012 1:00pm EDT
's a very good example of where germany could lead in the future and help the united states and the united kingdom to rebuild our badly weak bridges to the russian leadership as president putin takes power and we must do this because russia's just too important and russia is both in some ways an adversary, not in military terms, but politically, but in some ways it's a friend and partner of the united states. we want to accentuate the friendship and partnership. i think chanceler merkel is perfectly placed to be that bridge for the u.s. to russia. >> terry murphy. good day, sir. quick comment and a two-part question. comment number one is you kind of overlooked the trans-atlantic business dialogue which has been going on for 20 years quite prominently. but secondly on the question of germany, last week i think it was captain harry whales, junior officer of the british army, got an award from the beneficiary council for his efforts to support the wounded warriors of britain and we know that the wounded warriors here are supported by the populous. there was a piece in the paper that wounded
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 8:00pm EDT
to thank the lieutenant general and his staff with the united states of america vietnam memorial commemorative committee. the department of defense under the strong leadership of secretary of defense leon panetta has shown some really great leadership. they are making this day possible. this will be an amazing day that ever forget. thank you for spending at memorial day with us. this ceremony will be unlike anything that has ever been hosted here before. this is indeed a special occasion for this memorial. i know that you will be moved and inspired. i want to be the first to invite everyone to come back for another wonderful event, veterans day as we commemorate the 30th anniversary of the vietnam veterans memorial. we will also gather across the street to break down for the education center at the wall. this is a place where heroes will be honored and the veterans of vietnam will be remembered and the veterans of iraq and afghanistan will be honored there. thank you very much to those of you who have served. i hope to see all of you in november. until then, please learn more abo
CNBC
May 3, 2012 4:00am EDT
some of the issues the united states has long pushed. geithner recognizes china has moved towards a more market based exchange rate, but he does know that the yuan has more room to strengthen against the u.s. dollar and other currencies. he says a firmer yuan will give beijing more flexibility when it comes to balancing growth and inflation. take a look at the u.s. dollar versus the yuan, pretty much unchanged. hillary clinton touched on a host of diplomatic issues urging china to play its part when it comes to diffusing global tensions particularly with north korea and iran. clinton addressed prickly human rights issues which have taken center stage following the news surrounding dissident chen guangcheng. >> as part of our dialogue, the united states raises the importance of human rights and fundamental premiefreedoms. because we believe that all governments do have to answer to citizens aspirations for dignity and the rule of law and that no nation can or should deny those rights. >> and our very own emily chan has been following these developments and she's standing by in beij
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 8:30am EDT
in the southwest united states, where cities that were, if you take certain cities on the edge of california, on their edge of los angeles, for example, that were -- had a conventional post war democratic and have now become 90 to 95% hispanic, this is a democratic that wasn't even in the 1960 u.s. census. that's actually a big transformation in a fairly short space of time. and it has consequences. now, when you put the why, i would do you care, that's the benign view. people think -- we were talking about broadway just we went on air. that's like the production of holiday pel low doll -- "hello dolly" and then he ran out of brassy, middle-aged blonds, and then he changed it to an all-black cast, and people think that's what happened if you have a muslim netherlands or muslim britain, there will be fewer pubs, the pubs will have to close, but essentially it will basically still be the same, and i don't think that's -- no serious person would argue that. >> host: on the cover of the new paperback version of "america alone" there's a little sticker, soon to be banned in canada. >> guest: that
CSPAN
May 4, 2012 9:00am EDT
other have worked together back in the 1990's?" maybe this is a complement to the united states. guest: cooperation between two countries is good. mill to mill relationships which we have lots of countries including countries that are not our closest friends, we used to have these relationships with pakistan and we stopped at our peril in our relationship with pakistan and that has declined as you are well aware relationships, especially like economic dialogue like hillary clinton and secretary of the treasury tim geithner had in beijing are very good things. what we should watch and a dangerous time his cooperative relationships where we will have competition like china and russia. that is what we should try to achieve. if we were doing and in the late 1990's, that is a good thing. host: this question is from twitter - guest: first of all, i don't call it the arabis spring. -- the arab spring. i called the arab awakening. the organizing events is the birth of the arab citizen. think about that. citizens of mellon fell other officials have not done well in egypt yes. it is an important
CSPAN
May 29, 2012 12:00pm EDT
attack in the united states in view of taking oath not to harm it when he was awarded his american citizenship. he responded that he lied when he took the oath. that shahzad's lie amount to betrayal and does not fall under permissible lying if the enemy during times of war. please request that pakistani taliban brothers to address this matter. also draw their attention to the fact that brother faisal shahzad appeared in photograph alongside commander f masoud. leader of attp. when he acquires american citizenship this requires taking an oath to not to harm america if he is unaware of this matter he should be informed of it. we must act swiftly to remove the suspicion that he engaged in the betrayal. the times square attempted attack was not only one that had the al qaeda no hand in pakistan. it is clear from the letters that the group's indiscriminate attacks, pakistani taliban's indiscrimenant attacks against muslims were of major concern to al qaeda. this led them to write a letter to respected brother massoud, the leader of the ttp. the authors explicitly stated that the satisfa
CNN
May 13, 2012 1:00pm EDT
spending, and i think these worries are shared by many in the united states as well. let's get started. >>> it's been a big week in europe, and i have some distinguished experts to make sense of it all. peter mandleson is in london. he has not only held top cabinet positions under the labor governments of tony blair and gordon brown. he has also served as a member of the european commission. joseph joffrey joins us from hamburg. he is the editor of "the german weekly." elaine also joins us. she happens to be in new york, but she is the paris correspondent for the "new york times", a beat she has covered for more than a decade. and david frum rounds things out from d.c. he is a regular on the show and a former speechwriter for george w. bush. welcome all. elaine, let me start with you. you know francois hollande. you have interviewed him. is he a radical? is he a moderate? how does he strike you? >> francois hollande is mr. normal. he got elected president of france because he promised to be a normal candidate and a normal president. when i was traveling with him in 2007, he was so norm
MSNBC
May 4, 2012 1:00pm PDT
for oil. we can increase oil production in the united states by $4 milli 4 million barrels a day. it won't be done in places like nigeria. and we need to do more than label china a currency manipulator. we need to take absolute firm action that generates results. >> yep. so here's what's frustrated me which you two will appreciate over three years of doing this every day through various iterations and climates. my newest opinion, if you will, jared, is this. that the way that we talk about solving our problems, meaning the way that our government takes an inventory of what the problem is, plans to address the problem, executes the plan to problem and reviews what that plan was to adapt its future deployment is basically nonexistent. that our culture, not just nobody's fault -- our culture has prevailed by secrecy and two sets of rules at every layer and that naturally creates a dysfunctional structure. and until we repair that, that our capacity to solve these other issues is heavily impaired. no the that we shouldn't do it, but that our capacity to address them is impaired by our failur
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 5:00pm EDT
not understand why some people think that russia is the no. 1 adversary of the united states, we need russia and afghanistan. russia is helping us to resupply our forces in afghanistan. we have an interest in promoting counter-terrorism cooperation in russia. i was thinking that iran, right now the no. 1 national security issue of the united states is the iranian nuclear future. if you look at that constructs, russia is the most important country at the table for the united states. china will not be helpful. the european powers, of course, have a limited influence. if there is going to be an endgame on iran, where we convince them not to start -- not to stop short, they will have a lot to do with that solution. there will be a very close u.s.- russian interplay and cooperation on iran. meaning that the nato russian relationship is critically important. the promise of 10 years ago when we created the summit in italy, that promise has not been fulfilled. i would think a major order of business for the u.s. and germany is to bring back a good working relationship with the russian government. ve
PBS
May 4, 2012 6:30pm PDT
to apply to study in the united states. >> a week ago, the 40-year-old estate house arrest fleeing to the u.s. embassy in beijing. he was sent to a chinese hospital for treatment, which is when the activist made a dramatic call took a u.s. congressional hearing, asking for asylum, fearing for his and his family's life. >> though under heavy guard, he has been communicating with the outside world. he made an emotional call for freedom from his hospital in beijing. sadly, it seemed as if the diplomatic logjam between the u.s. and china might be breaking -- suddenly, it seemed as if the logjam might be breaking. >> i'm pleased that today, our ambassador has spoken with him again. our embassy staff and our doctor had a chance to meet with him, and he confirms that he and his family now want to go to the united states so he can pursue his studies. >> the plan gives china a way to save face and avoids the sticky issue of granting chen asylum. china's foreign ministry has played down the up side. >> chen has the same rights as other citizens and they applied to study abroad and go through relevant
CNN
May 5, 2012 2:00pm EDT
austerity in the united states down the road. >> they can't even decide on $6 billion for student loan subsidies. $6 billion for student loan subsidy lows washington if to a complete uproar and just the shear size of all of the problems to come, it's a little scary. >> i'm with you on this. ken, you made the point when you talked about debt and christine said do you mean consumer debt or government debt and you said consumer debt. this may be the big problem that needs to be solved. it also may be a problem that we can start taking into our own hands between government doesn't help us solve it. we'll talk about that when we come back. this is truly a nation of haves and have knots. and we'll look at the growing debt divide. how much debt is good for you and the economy? is debt the great in-equalizer in this country? and of course later on, i know you want to talk about facebook. it prepares to go public. we'll tell you what you need to know and if you can and should buy stock in facebook. so, by combining your auto and renters insurance, we can save you $600. $600? wow, you're like a
CNN
May 20, 2012 7:00am PDT
in the united states. >>> this is "gps, the global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a very important show today dealing with the biggest problems facing the world. as europe is crumbling, the man who is seen as its potential savior is italy's new prime minister mario monti, super mario. i have an exclusive interview with him. monty has been trying to reform italy, reassure markets, and keep the jrmans happy. if he succeeds, ae charts a path out of the crisis for other countries. then iran. it's in dire economic straits for a very different reason. we have another exclusive. if one with iran's finance minister about just how crippling u.s.-led sanctions have been for his nation. next up, a conversation with paul, the biggest question in the world today is whether to spend or whether to cut. krugman is the leading voice saying stimulate. i'll ask him to defend his views. all that plus superstitions in the race for space. but, first, here's my take. everyone is worried that greece might default on its national debt. that
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